February 2017 Featured Artist: Shanice Budraj

shanice-feature

Shanice and I crossed paths a few times before I had the pleasure of working with her. I knew she was studying art at the time but I had no idea what a great artist she is. She’s a fantastic designer with an uncanny ability to identify fonts at a glimpse. She gave me an opportunity to ask her a few questions about herself:

Brinley: Hi Shanice. Thanks for coming out of the shadows and allowing me to interview you.
Shanice: No problem, no problem 🙂

Brinley: You know, all of us at the office admire your work. You’re an excellent designer. When did you realize that you wanted to pursue a career in the creative field.
Shanice: Being creative has been something that’s always been in me since I was very little. Probably even before I could even hold a pencil properly. I’m not really the type to sit and do admin work all day and being a doctor isn’t for me either. Becoming a designer was the best choice I could have made. I love being able to create new things everyday

Brinley: What, would you say, inspires you?
Shanice: Sometimes I get inspired by the places I’ve been to, sometimes I get inspired by the books or articles I read, whether it be fantasy or reality. Depends on the day really.

Brinley: I’ve never seen you having an off day. You consistently deliver beautiful artwork. Have you ever experienced artists block? If so, how did you manage to overcome it?
Shanice: YES! What helps me is doing two (or more) different projects at the same time, or more than one aspect of the same project so that I can switch between them. When I hit a wall on one thing, I move over to something else and come back to it later with fresh eyes, when I’ve had a chance to get my mind off of it.

Brinley: As an artist studied in both fields, do you feel you’re more of a fine artist than a designer or vice versa?
Shanice: Design has been part of my daily routine for the past two years but I still consider myself more of a fine artist. I think on some level they both tie in to each other. When it comes to choosing colours, fonts or just images in general. Having that background helps with making things look visually appealing, which is what fine art is to me.

Brinley: What is your single worst peeve you see in art or design? What makes you cringe?
Shanice: I have many that sometimes all stick out at once. It really bugs me when alignment on an advert is off, if there’s too much information all over the place, too many fonts and too many colours. The same goes with art because my style of art is clean and somewhat realistic. I find that the “messier” works don’t appeal to me, although, I admit they can still be great works of art.

Brinley: What do you wish you knew about being a designer before you started doing it full-time?
Shanice: I really wish I knew that clients truly know nothing about what they want! I have never had a clear brief with proper direction or guidance as to the message the client is trying to convey so it’s always a “shot-the-dark” approach to most adverts I design.

Brinley: Too true. I’m pretty sure many designers will agree to that. On the other side of the coin, what, for you,  is the best part about being a designer?
Shanice: I love experimenting with ideas and I find it most pleasant when a client is extremely happy with the creativity. It makes me feel as if I moved away from the norm until the next client who comes along with their “do anything” brief.

Brinley: Very super awesome. I find that, as artists and creative people, we grow by sharing ideas and opinions with each other. It inspires us and builds us up so thank you for your time, Shanice.

Here’s some of Shanice’s artwork. See more of her brilliant work on her Behance portfolio.

shanice advert design

Shanice Budraj Self Portrait

shanice budraj Nelson Mandela Watercolour

St Basils Cathedral - Paper Cut Out

Shanice Budraj Pietermaritzburg City Hall Vector Illustration


 

Remember, all content is free for personal use. Please check their individual licences if you want to use them for commercial purposes.

How to use these files

Vector graphics (.ai, .eps, .svg files) will require vector editing software like Adobe Illustrator or InkScape. Download InkScape for free.

Photoshop files (.psd) will require Adobe Photoshop or similar image editing software. GIMP is a free image processor which can handle certain .psd files. Download GIMP at www.gimp.org.

Fonts can be installed on just about any computer.



 

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